28 Phaidros (Greek Readings I)

Phaidros was a contemporary and—as with Plato—a student of Socrates. He was however also a young man whom Plato had loved. He—and not the colleague of the same name in the passel of students around Socrates—was immortalized in the master’s dialogue of the same name. Concerning its subject, and whether love has desire, or desire has love, under its control,...

27 Plato’s “Phaidros”

On Love and Lust Plato’s dialogue “Phaidros” is a peculiarly heterogeneous artwork. It deals simultaneously with truth, and also with the invalidity of isosthenias. In this case also with the provocative, in a speech on Lysias’ proclaimed and subsequently well-founded argument, that one may only indulge oneself sexually with those in whom one is not in love: “And I maintain...

26 Response to the Blog “On Love and Desire”

 Response (Interview) Why did you choose such a delicate subject? You’ve ventured to go quite far with it. Why? Pæderasty and homosexuality have become something of an old chestnut in public discourse recently. One even hears intimations of a new “culture war.” My subject is love and desire as discussed by Plato, particularly in his “Phaidros.” Of course, to the...

25 On Truth and Science

Truth is an idea that shines through even the greatest untruth. That is, as Plato describes it, something eternally divine, and attribute of the gods. Without truth there is no lie, no probability. And nevertheless the image of truth deteriorates—that is, the term—that we have of it and employ for it, in order that we might achieve some consensus over...

24 Of Thinking (Interview with Jean François Lyotard)

Thinking of thinking; i.e., reflection over thinking itself, is according to Aristotle the most exquisite task of philosophy and of humankind. Of Philosophy, because it leads to the realization of truth. Of mankind, because thinking alone sets human beings apart from all other animals. Fierce passions and feelings may also be found among other animals, in order to preserve themselves...